Category Archives: Our Land

Our Land: Midterm Elections And The Environment

1215 Our Land

October 12, 2018 — Clean air and water are important to everyone, no matter where they live or what their political views might be. Here in New Mexico, we have challenges with drought, climate change, public lands, and even energy development. Environment issues also dovetail with the economy and public health.

And yet, most candidates don’t talk about the environment, drought, water or even the resilience of agriculture in the state as the region warms and water supplies tighten.

On Our Land this month, Correspondent Laura Paskus talks about where the environment fits into this year’s election with Lonna Atkeson, a professor in the Political Science Department at the University of New Mexico, and Adrian Oglesby, director of the Utton Transboundary Resources Center at UNM’s School of Law.

Why don’t most candidates talk about the environment, unless they’re pressed to do so, and how much does the environment matter to voters? And what will New Mexico’s next governor, and the 2019 New Mexico Legislature, need to address when it comes to water, the environment, and state agencies right off the bat in the new year?

Guests:
Lonna Atkeson, professor, UNM Political Science Department
Adrian Oglesby, director, Utton Transboundary Resources Center, UNM Law School

 

Making Crossings Safe For Wildlife And Drivers

Our Land Wildlife Crossing

September 14, 2018 – If you’ve ever white-knuckled it through a canyon or overpass, hoping you don’t encounter deer or elk on the highway, you’re not alone. Our highways and roads get us where we need to go, but they also slice up wildlife habitat. And when animals try to get across those roads to get to water, food or mating grounds, they’re in danger of being killed. And motorists are at risk of accident.

Fifteen years ago, Wild Friends—a statewide student group organized through the University of New Mexico School of Law—lobbied the state legislature to convene a workshop to look at the problems of wildlife-driver accidents. The New Mexico Carnivore Working Group organized the Critical Mass Workshop in 2003 to look at which highways in New Mexico were most dangerous for wildlife and drivers. Tijeras Canyon where animals move back and forth between the Sandia and Manzano Mountains, ranked near the top.

Correspondent Laura Paskus takes us to the Tijeras Canyon Safe Passage Project outside Albuquerque to look at one project from the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish and the Department of Transportation that’s trying to protect wildlife and keep drivers safe, too.