Category Archives: episode

Access to Children’s Healthcare

Thursday, July 25 at 7 p.m. on Ch. 5.1

In New Mexico, about 9 percent of children do not have health insurance coverage. We all pay when children aren’t covered. These kids are less likely to receive necessary medication and more likely to experience a hospital stay that could have been avoided by seeing a doctor earlier. And healthier kids lead to more productive, healthy adults.

Ideally this situation would improve under the national Affordable Healthcare Act. There will be an expansion of the Medicaid program and a new health insurance exchange to help families purchase coverage. But will things get better?

On this month’s Public Square, we hear from mothers who have struggled to make sure their kids have coverage. And we talk with community and health advocates about the challenges in getting kids access to care.

Community leaders include State Rep. James Roger Madalena, D-Jemez Pueblo, State Sen. Sue Wilson Beffort, R-Albuquerque, and Rory Cobb, director of outreach for New Mexico Health Connections.

Join New Mexico PBS for a PUBLIC SQUARE, where civic dialogue takes center stage. Funding for PUBLIC SQUARE was provided in part by a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. PUBLIC SQUARE is hosted & produced by Megan Kamerick.

Quotes From PUBLIC SQUARE Participants:

“I was terrified that something would send us into a debt for a medical emergency we couldn’t handle.”
~Micaela Cadena, Mother and Policy Director, Young Women United

“There are 40,000 kids in NM who should be on Medicaid and who are not on the program.”
~Sireesha Manne, Attorney, New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty

“The process is so cumbersome. It’s not for lack of trying on everyone’s part to get those kids covered.”
~Rory Cobb, Director of Community Outreach, New Mexico Health Connections

“There’s no way to handle it. You just have to file the bills away and prepare when there is a chance to pay.”
~Lillian Sanchez, Mother with child on Medicaid

Funding for PUBLIC SQUARE was provided in part by a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Impact of Domestic Violence on Children

Thursday, June 27 at 7 p.m. on Ch. 5.1

The impact of domestic violence on children can last a lifetime. Children exposed to violence in the home often experience psychosomatic illnesses, depression, and suicidal tendencies. Later in life, these children are at greater risk for substance abuse, teen pregnancy, and criminal behavior than those raised in homes without violence.

Albuquerque is a leader in providing innovative solutions and resources for victims with resources like the Family Advocacy center. Yet, the statistics are disturbing as the number of domestic violence cases remains high.

This month’s Public Square focuses on what is being done to reduce domestic violence and provide support for victims.

In this program, victims of domestic violence share the impact on their families and how they have overcome the violence in their lives. We also are joined by diverse community groups working to provide support and resources. Community leaders include Albuquerque Police Chief Ray Shultz, District Attorney Kari Brandenburg , and Rosemary Cosgrove -Aguliar Special Commissioner for Domestic Violence Second Judicial District Court.

Join New Mexico PBS for a PUBLIC SQUARE, where civic dialogue takes center stage. Funding for PUBLIC SQUARE was provided in part by a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. PUBLIC SQUARE is hosted & produced by Megan Kamerick.

Quotes From PUBLIC SQUARE Participants:

“It’s hard to worry about what the capital of North Dakota is if you’re not sure your mom’s safe at home.”
~Rosemary Cosgrove-Aguilar, domestic violence hearing officer

“As a kid growing up in this environment I lied to the cops when they came to my house. I made them coffee, I never wanted them to leave, but I lied through my teeth.”
~Joanne Fine, survivor of childhood domestic violence

“As a mother and as an immigrant I was afraid thinking I’m never going to see my children again.”
~Flor Maria Caro, domestic violence survivor

“That part of our brain of flight or fight is so much stronger for survival, it’s shutting down other parts of the brain that would produce algebra, poetry, music.”
~Patricia McKeen, treatment provider for batterers

Funding for PUBLIC SQUARE was provided in part by a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Early Brain Development

Thursday, May 30 at 7 p.m. on Ch. 5.1

Before children learn to talk, it may seem like not much is happening. In fact, from age 0 to 3 is the most important time for brain development. In those first few years of life, 700 new neural connections are formed every second. Young children naturally reach out for interaction. In the absence of responses, their brains don’t form as expected. That can impact their learning and social development.

What do we need to do to ensure all of New Mexico’s children get effective early brain development?

On this month’s Public Square, we talk with experts, educators and advocates, including Ellen Galinsky, founder of Mind in the Making and author of “The Seven Essential Skills Every Child Needs.”

Community leaders include Dan Haggard, deputy director of the Children Youth & Family Department’s Early Childhood Services, Brenda Kofahl, Pre-K program specialist with the Public Education Department and Heather Vaughn, early childhood manager with Albuquerque Public Schools.

Join New Mexico PBS for a PUBLIC SQUARE, where civic dialogue takes center stage. Funding for PUBLIC SQUARE was provided in part by a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. PUBLIC SQUARE is hosted & produced by Megan Kamerick.

Quotes From PUBLIC SQUARE Participants:

“That’s our tagline. School success begins at birth.”
Dorothy Kerwin, early child training and development consultant

“I think this is one of disconnects we have in our society. We’re not paying attention to those infants up to three years old.”
~Pam Segel, early childhood development specialist

“When they’re coming in there is that achievement gap, and it may narrow, but it doesn’t ever close.”
~Peggy Candelaria, principal of Manzano Mesa Elementary School

“Psychosocial factors like domestic violence, poverty, just general stresses even in utero actually affect the way the brain develops.”
~Alexandra Cvijanovich, president of New Mexico Pediatric Society

“All of us can be brain builders and we’re not doing that so we have along way to go.”
~Ellen Galinsky, founder of Mind in the Making

Funding for PUBLIC SQUARE was provided in part by a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Transitioning Out of Foster Care

Thursday, April 25 at 7 p.m. on Ch. 5.1

Each year in New Mexico, about 100 youth in foster care will hit age 18. That means they are then defined as adults and lose most of the services they rely upon daily.

The outcomes for these youth are not good. In 2011 in New Mexico, only 25 percent graduate from high school and 46 percent experienced episodes of homelessness by the age of 17. Nationally, one quarter have attempted suicide. Girls are more than twice as likely to be pregnant by age 19. The annual cost per cohort among these young adults is estimated to be $7 billion, according to the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative.

How can we ensure these young people have the support they need to succeed as adults?

On this month’s Public Square, former foster children talk about their struggles in the system and how it impacted their ability to be independent adults. Advocates talk about their work helping young people navigate the many paths out of the system to self-sufficiency.

Community leaders include State Sen. Michael Padilla, D-Albuquerque, Patrice Perrault, youth services bureau chief with Children Youth and Families Department – Protective Services, and Judge John Romero of the Children’s Court Division.

Join New Mexico PBS for a PUBLIC SQUARE, where civic dialogue takes center stage. Funding for PUBLIC SQUARE was provided in part by a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. PUBLIC SQUARE is hosted & produced by Megan Kamerick.

Quotes From PUBLIC SQUARE Participants:

“I completely lost contact with friends, family, everything was taken away from me.”
~Lauren Huichan, Former foster child and youth advocate

“Biggest danger to adolescents in foster care is they have to be adults faster than they need to be adults. The biggest help for kids is to be a kid.”
~Jomo Z.M. Thomas, II, Clinical Director, Youth Development Inc.

“We need to see every relationship that child has as an opportunity, and work so hard to preserve it.”
~Liz McGrath, Co-Director, Pegasus Legal Services for Children

“We don’t think outside the box often enough. And I don’t believe the system encourages young people to be more vocal. We kind of put them in silos as though they were separate and different kids. They’re all our kids.”
~John Romero, Presiding Judge, Children’s Court Division

Funding for PUBLIC SQUARE was provided in part by a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.