Tag Archives: sexual harassment

Sexual Harassment In New Mexico Politics

February 2, 2018 – Many women in New Mexico have spoken out in recent months about sexual harassment at work. Lobbyist Vanessa Alarid told the New York Times in December that former lawmaker Thomas Garcia asked for sex in exchange for a vote on a bill. And Heather Brewer told the Santa Fe New Mexican about a candidate who asked her for sex when she went to work for his campaign. Host Gene Grant sat down this week with Alarid and Brewer to talk about sexual harassment in politics.

WARNING: STRONG LANGUAGE

There is some language in this interview that might make some people uncomfortable.  In addition, some of the words violate FCC rules about appropriate on-air content. When we aired this segment, we “bleeped” the most controversial words and phrases. The web video, however, is unaltered.

NMiF also reached out to Thomas Garcia and asked him for a statement:

Vanessa Alarid’s politically motivated statements have been misleading and filled with false accusations in an effort to damage my reputation and causing irreparable damage, however, the strength of my family, and the power of our faith, has allowed us to move forward positively. From day one I, unequivocally, have denied the allegations made by Vanessa Alarid and I will continue to work to clear my name of these false accusations.

People need to see through the propaganda and exaggerations to find the true facts. We are now, unfortunately, living in a time where the values and principles we once held dear are being thrown out without any type of due process. Baseless accusations are being spread through social media without any vetting, verification or scrutiny afforded to individuals as our fundamental rights are decimated. Individuals are retroactively being attacked and lumped together into one category of inappropriate behavior. Unfortunately, everyday women are being abused and assaulted. These types of acts will continue to occur unless we are diligent to ensure perpetrators are convicted for their acts. Not convicted by social media, but by the courts. While there are many people that have legitimate claims of abuse we cannot let the #MeToo movement become a tool of revenge, as it allows real predators to blend into society as the spotlight is focused on famous individuals.

Almost nine years after Vanessa Alarid alleges I engaged in inappropriate behavior there are truths that cannot be denied. Anyone who takes the time to look into the statements made by Vanessa Alarid will find the truth should they choose to look at the facts. Even if the events as portrayed by Vanessa Alarid were factual they fall well short of any type of sexual assault, violence or harassment. Her own statements, that continue to change based on the media outlet she discusses the allegations with, show there was nothing done to meet the basic threshold of wrongdoing. From the time she alleges these incidents took place I ran for re-election and was victorious without any accusation of wrongdoing. When I was recently at the Capitol, she contacted the media promising to assault me if she sees me at the Capitol in the future, however, she continued to lobby me for assistance for three years after the incident allegedly occurred. Additionally, by continuing to focus attention on her false claims against me, she continues to protect and hide the identities of individuals that continue to engage in inappropriate behavior at the Capitol. She, along with Representative Fajardo claim to have witnessed inappropriate behavior, yet the behavior of these individuals continues to go unreported.

I look forward to continuing moving forward in a positive manner as the facts of the false accusations come to light in the future.

Lin Farley: On Coining The Term “Sexual Harassment”

January 26, 2018 – Lin Farley was a journalist and an instructor at Cornell University when she coined the term “sexual harassment” to summarize what so many women were experiencing at their jobs across the country. She went on to write the book “Sexual Shakedown: The Sexual Harassment of Women on the Job.”

It was a watershed moment the abuse of power so many women experienced in their jobs finally had a name. Many realized they weren’t alone, that other women were experiencing the same things they were, and there was great optimism that workplace culture would change.

When Anita Hill testified against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas in 1992, many advocates believed, again, that real change would take place. There has certainly been progress, but as we have learned, sexual harassment and abuse have continued to thrive in many workplaces, from Hollywood studios to agricultural fields and factory floors. Lin Farley told correspondent Megan Kamerick what she thinks needs to happen to create a truly equal workplace without harassment.


Guest:

Lin Farley, author and workplace harassment expert

WARNING: STRONG LANGUAGE
There is some language in this interview that might make some people uncomfortable.  In addition, some of the words may violate FCC rules about appropriate on-air content.

When we aired this segment, we “bleeped” the most controversial words and phrases. The web video, however, is unaltered.

As you will hear, Farley thinks it is important to use specific language when talking about sexual harassment, even if it makes people cringe.

What do you think about her stance on how we talk about sexual harassment? And what do you think about our decision to edit the broadcast version? Leave your comments here or fill out our contact form.

Additional Reading:
Who Came Up With The Term Sexual Harassment? Washington Post
I Coined The Term Sexual Harassment. Corporations Stole It. New York Times
Women Begin To Speak Out About Sexual Harassment New York Times 1975 article
The First Brave Woman Who Alleged Sexual Harassment Legacy.com
Sexual Harassment, Revisited On The Media
Women Are Speaking Up About Sexual Harassment. Is A Sea Change Coming? PBS News Hour
What Men Didn’t Say At the Golden Globes The Atlantic
This Moment Isn’t (Just) About Sex. It’s Really About Work The Cut